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How compassionate architecture can create dignity for all
VIDEO: This video takes to task the lack of diversity in design that leads to thoughtless, compassionless spaces. Design has a unique ability to dignify and make people feel valued, respected, honoured and seen. The speaker, John Cary, calls for architects and designers to expand their ranks and commit to serving the public good, not just the privileged few. "Well-designed spaces are not just a matter of taste or a questions of aesthetics," he says. "They literally shape our ideas about who we are in the world and what we deserve." SOURCE: TED ...
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Ikigai: how the Japanese find meaning in life
INFOGRAPHIC/ ARTICLE/ VIDEO: Ikigai is a Japanese concept that means "a reason for being." It is similar to the French phrase “raison d'être”. Everyone, according to Japanese culture, has an ikigai. Finding it requires a deep and often lengthy search of self. Such a search is important to the belief that discovering one's ikigai brings satisfaction and meaning to life. SOURCE: Big Think ...
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CEEV: Transform your LinkedIn profile into a spectacular resume
UTILITY: Stop wasting time typing up a new resume every time. Use what you already have - your LinkedIn profile. It only takes a click. SOURCE: CEEV ...
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5 big philosophical questions

5 big philosophical questions
LONG ARTICLE FOR HARDCORE READERS: In modern times, the business of philosophy is no longer trying to attain empirical truths about the world (we’ve got science for that), but rather to critically explore concepts and notions informed, whenever possible, by science. SOURCE: Footnotes to Plato ...
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The danger of a single story

The danger of a single story
VIDEO: Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding. SOURCE: TED via YouTube ...
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How utilitarian are you? The Oxford Utilitarianism Scale
UTILITY: Jeremy Bentham, the founder of utilitarianism, described utility as the sum of all pleasure that results from an action, minus the suffering of anyone involved in the action. Utilitarianism is a version of consequentialism, which states that the consequences of any action are the only standard of right and wrong. Here’s a simple questionnaire that can assess the degree to which you subscribe to this controversial ethical theory. SOURCE: Practical Ethics - University of Oxford ...
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The world is falling apart -- not really, it's your cognitive biases that make you feel that way
LONG ARTICLE FOR HARDCORE READERS: The world appears to be in a rough place right now. If you turn on the TV or open up your web browser, you’re almost guaranteed to be bombarded by bad news. But is the world really doomed? Or is your animal brain playing tricks on you? Chin up—things aren’t always as bad as they seem. SOURCE: Lifehacker ...
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The importance of coming second (in scientific publishing)
ARTICLE: Some scientific journals are defusing the fear of getting “scooped” by making it easier for scientists to publish results that have appeared elsewhere. SOURCE: PLoS Biology and The Atlantic ...
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Here's a complete guide to Climate Change in simple language
LONG ARTICLE FOR HARDCORE READERS: At no point in mankind's history has there been a threat to all of humanity as frightening and impactful as Climate Change (we have reached the point in time when it has to be capitalised). Here is a simple, clear, well written summary of what it is all about. SOURCE: Wired ...
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Visual intelligence: what you don't see is as important as what you see
VIDEO: Visual intelligence is the concept that we see more than we can process and it's the idea of thinking about what we see, taking in the information and what do we really need to live our lives more purposefully and do our jobs more effectively. In this video, the speaker Amy Herman shows us the importance of considering what is missing in the images we see as much as what is present. SOURCE: Big Think via YouTube ...
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The urgent need for managing our Earth as a common resource
VIDEO: We all share one planet -- we breathe the same air, drink the same water and depend on the same oceans, forests and biodiversity. Economist Naoko Ishii is on a mission to protect these shared resources, known as the global commons, that are vital for our survival. In an eye-opening talk about the wellness of the planet, Ishii outlines four economic systems we need to change to safeguard the global commons, making the case for a new kind of social contract with the earth. SOURCE: TED ...
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How to spot someone lying

How to spot someone lying
LONG ARTICLE FOR HARDCORE READERS: We’re terrible at detecting lies. Even technology doesn’t improve our chances—a 2009 study examined a technique called voice stress analysis and found that it worked about as well as guessing. To make things worse, a 2014 study found that emotionally intelligent individuals are more easily duped by liars. That’s not to say we can’t improve our chances. While there is no single, silver bullet method to recognize deception, there are many different ways that lies leak. SOURCE: Quick & dirty tips ...
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All the science about happiness in one infographic
INFOGRAPHIC: One infographic that covers all the science. SOURCE: Happify ...
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Here's a list of the best apps you’ve probably never heard of
UTILITY: “What’s one app you use a lot that most people don’t know about?” Here’s a list of 27 items. SOURCE: The Next Web ...
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Can colour be used as a tool in communication?
ARTICLE: Colour could provide a communication tool which offers a different way of talking about our feelings. Is it possible that colour could be used as a language to express how we feel? Are there ways in which we can use colour to develop non-verbal approaches to assess mood and well-being outcomes, with potential application in a variety of therapy and clinical situations? SOURCE: The Conversation ...
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How compassionate architecture can create dignity for all

Compassionate architecture

This video takes to task the lack of diversity in design that leads to thoughtless, compassionless spaces. Design has a unique ability to dignify and make people feel valued, respected, honoured and seen. The speaker, John Cary, calls for architects and designers to expand their ranks and commit to serving the public good, not just the privileged few. “Well-designed spaces are not just a matter of taste or a questions of aesthetics,” he says. “They literally shape our ideas about who we are in the world and what we deserve.”

SOURCE: TED

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Buildings are, first and foremost, spaces for carrying out human activities. Ideally, they have to be subservient to the needs of the people who work within. In reality, users are seldom consulted when architectural plans are drawn up and the building commissioned. Architecture, seen commonly as a creative and artistic discipline, often places form ahead of function. Aesthetics elements are the sole criteria used in judging merit. Ask the users, and you might get a completely different opinion. Le Corbusier’s design for the city of Chandigarh in India was an arrogant act that ended up in a cold, impractical set of buildings that had nothing to do with the culture or the landscape of the territory it was set in.

In general, public buildings such as hospitals, seldom take into consideration the requirements of their users. Far from being spaces for healing, they serve to intensify the anxiety and dread that patients feel within the premises. Care is often given in windowless, artificially lit spaces that are forbidding.

This video takes to task the lack of diversity in design that leads to thoughtless, compassionless spaces. Design has a unique ability to dignify and make people feel valued, respected, honoured and seen. The speaker, John Cary, calls for architects and designers to expand their ranks and commit to serving the public good, not just the privileged few. “Well-designed spaces are not just a matter of taste or a questions of aesthetics,” he says. “They literally shape our ideas about who we are in the world and what we deserve.”


 

Ikigai: how the Japanese find meaning in life

Ikigai

Ikigai is a Japanese concept that means “a reason for being.” It is similar to the French phrase “raison d’être”. Everyone, according to Japanese culture, has an ikigai. Finding it requires a deep and often lengthy search of self. Such a search is important to the belief that discovering one’s ikigai brings satisfaction and meaning to life. (from Wikipedia)

SOURCE: Big Think


The whole concept may be boiled down to four questions:

1) What do you love?

2) What are you good at?

3) What does the world need from you?

4) What can you get paid for?

Here’s a handy Venn diagram:

 

Author Dan Buettner told the BBC in order to find your ikigai, you should write three lists. The first is your values, the second things enjoy doing, and the last, things you are good at. “The cross section of the three lists is your ikigai,” he said.

Video


CEEV: Transform your LinkedIn profile into a spectacular resume

CEEV

Stop wasting time typing up a new resume every time. Use what you already have – your LinkedIn profile. It only takes a click.

SOURCE: CEEV


5 big philosophical questions

5 questions

In modern times, the business of philosophy is no longer trying to attain empirical truths about the world (we’ve got science for that), but rather to critically explore concepts and notions informed, whenever possible, by science.

SOURCE: Footnotes to Plato


Here’s the list:

1. Do we really have free will?

2. Can we know anything at all?

3. Who am “I”?

4. What is death?

5. What would “global justice” look like?

Philosophical questions are unlikely to ever be answered definitively.

 

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