Category: To do list

Here's a list of 1,174 Coursera courses that are completely free

Here’s a list of 1,174 Coursera courses that are completely free

UTILITY: Generally speaking, Coursera courses are free to audit but if you want to access graded assignments or earn a Course Certificate, you will need to pay. There are a few courses that are still completely free. When you sign up for these courses, you would see an option of “Full Course, No Certificate.” More than 1,150 Coursera MOOCs (1,174, to be exact) that are still completely free (including the graded assignments, minus the certificate). SOURCE: Fast Company ...
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Your speech Is packed with misunderstood, unconscious messages: "dysfluencies"

Your speech Is packed with misunderstood, unconscious messages: “dysfluencies”

ARTICLE: folk wisdom that ums and uhs betray a speaker as weak, nervous, ignorant, and sloppy, and should be avoided at all costs, even in spontaneous conversation. Many scientists, though, think that our cultural fixation with stamping out what they call “disfluencies” is deeply misguided. Saying um is no character flaw, but an organic feature of speech; far from distracting listeners, there’s evidence that it focuses their attention in ways that enhance comprehension. SOURCE: Nautilus ...
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The brain-body connection is more than we think it is

The brain-body connection is more than we think it is

LONG ARTICLE FOR HARDCORE READERS/ VIDEO: An all pervasive “cerebral mystique” creates a false dichotomy between the brain and the body and ignores bodily influences on our psychology, from chemicals in the blood to bacteria in the gut. What’s outside the body also influences the mind. The environment floods the brain with the equivalent of about 10 megabytes of information per second SOURCE: National Geographic ...
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This is where your childhood memories went

This is where your childhood memories went

ARTICLE: While the brain undergoes this prolonged development outside the womb, the large and complex network of disparate brain regions that collectively create and maintain our memories is still under construction and not as capable of forming memories as it will be in adulthood. As a consequence, the long-term memories formed in our first three years of life are the least stable memories we ever make and highly prone to disintegrating as we age. Studies have shown that people can retrieve at least some childhood memories by responding to specific prompts. Even if we manage to untangle a few distinct memories that survive the tumultuous cycles of growth and decay in the infant brain, we can never fully trust them; some of them might be partly or entirely fabricated. SOURCE: Nautilus ...
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Why is sarcasm so difficult to detect in texts and emails?

Why is sarcasm so difficult to detect in texts and emails?

ARTICLE: Sarcasm, has been defined as "Words used to express something other than and especially the opposite of the literal meaning of a sentence." Sarcasm thrives in ambiguous situations - and that's the main issue. Studies have examined the use of sarcasm in a variety of everyday situations. The problem is that a lot of previous studies of sarcasm have been done on spoken sarcasm, which tends to give listeners cues. Studies have shown that people realise that they have a tough time interpreting sarcasm in writing. Algorithms have actually been built to determine the presence of sarcasm and rudeness in tweets, user reviews and online conversations. In order to correctly detect sarcasm, researchers found that algorithms need both linguistic and semantic information built in. Sarcasm's subtlety means that the algorithms require more specification in their coding - unless you #sarcasm. SOURCE: The Conversation ...
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I have forgotten how to read

I have forgotten how to read

LONG ARTICLE FOR HARCORE READERS: For most of modern life, printed matter was "the model, the metaphor, and the measure of all discourse." The resonance of printed books – their lineal structure, the demands they make on our attention – touches every corner of the world we've inherited. But online life makes me into a different kind of reader – a cynical one. I scrounge, now, for the useful fact; I zero in on the shareable link. My attention – and thus my experience – fractures. Online reading is about clicks, and comments, and points. When I take that mindset and try to apply it to a beaten-up paperback, my mind bucks. SOURCE: The Globe and Mail ...
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5 big philosophical questions

5 big philosophical questions

LONG ARTICLE FOR HARDCORE READERS: In modern times, the business of philosophy is no longer trying to attain empirical truths about the world (we’ve got science for that), but rather to critically explore concepts and notions informed, whenever possible, by science. SOURCE: Footnotes to Plato ...
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The importance of coming second (in scientific publishing)

The importance of coming second (in scientific publishing)

ARTICLE: Some scientific journals are defusing the fear of getting “scooped” by making it easier for scientists to publish results that have appeared elsewhere. SOURCE: PLoS Biology and The Atlantic ...
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