Category: Quickly

6 major indicators strongly confirm we are living in the best time in history

INFOGRAPHIC: “All things considered, do you think the world is getting better or worse, or neither getting better nor worse?”

A survey done with this question documented the very negative perspective of global development that most of us have. More than 9 out of 10 people do not think that the world is getting better.

Evidence from empirical data shows the opposite picture. On each of 6 vital indicators of human wellbeing, there has been dramatic improvements over the centuries to our present date.

SOURCE: Our World in Data

How verbs and nouns got Apollo to the moon

VIDEO: The Apollo guidance computer did a lot with a little. We are constantly reminded that the computer used for this historic event had less power than a modern smartphone. Yes, a smartphone can hold more information but it doesn’t exactly have the software to get you to the Moon. But the comparatively weaker Apollo guidance computer (AGC) did, and though it didn’t have a keyboard and monitor like your desktop, it did speak in the familiar language we use every day of nouns and verbs.

SOURCE: Discover/ Vintage Space

Holding on to unrealised ideas blocks creativity: downsize your “idea debt”

ARTICLE/ VIDEO: Idea debt is the pile of ideas you keep revisiting but never finish, or even never begin. It can be a book, an app, a business, any project that grows in your mind but not in reality. It feels much more impressive than the projects you’re actually carrying out, with all their disappointments and compromises. Like financial debt, a little well-managed idea debt is healthy. It’s good to mull over ideas, to file them for later, to give yourself more creative options than you use. But sometimes you need to pay that debt down. Luckily you’re your own debtor, so you have plenty of options.

SOURCE: Lifehacker & Medium

Hacker News — don’t let the title scare you. A treasure trove of good reads

WEBSITE: Y Combinator, one of the best known Silicon Valley accelerators, launched an internal side project in 2007 that would end up becoming highly influential in a different and surprising way. Its user-powered news aggregator called Hacker News, which is now visited by 20 million people per month, has become a mainstay for entrepreneurs, tech professionals, and venture capitalists around the world. Using a Reddit-like interface, users can upvote and downvote articles that they think have the most relevance to trends and issues affecting the tech sector.

The user interface is nerdy in the extreme: absolutely bereft of anything that smells even faintly of frills. Although the articles are centred around the tech space, there is a whole treasure trove of interesting stuff that the users throw up. Hacker News is a total delight.

SOURCE: Hacker News

How open minded are you? A simple eye test will tell you

ARTICLE/ UTILITY: Researchers administered a “big five” personality test to participants: measuring their extroversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness to experience. They were then given a test for binocular rivalry. Participants were shown a patch of red in one eye and a patch of green in the other. Those who scored higher for openness were able to merge both images into one unified red-green patch. Those who scored lower for openness tended to switch back and forth between the incompatible images.

SOURCE: Good/ Journal of Research in Personality

We could all do with learning how to improvise a little better

LONG ARTICLE FOR HARDCORE READERS: Life is intrinsically changing, moving, disappointing and positively surprising. Meeting life with unbending expectations is a recipe for disaster. Those who expect the world to conform to their preset calculations and predictions are destined to be frustrated. They are uncomfortable with spontaneity, and rail against deviations.cOur bohemian tendencies assume that improvisation is the antidote to rigid thinking. But improvisation isn’t foolproof either. Are there ways to learn how to improvise better, not only in the arts, but in life?

SOURCE: Aeon

Keeping a conversation going: 
tips and strategies

VIDEO INFOGRAPHIC: How do you think of questions to ask people in a casual conversation? It can be hard to come up with them when you’re talking to someone new, and even sometimes when you’re speaking with an old friend. Here are some strategies for making conversations interesting. It takes practice, like all skills. While such planning may seem “artificial,” paradoxically enough, the more you prepare, the more naturally the conversation will flow.

SOURCE: The Art of Manliness

If I Googled you, what would I find? Managing your digital footprint

SLIDE SHOW: Your Digital Footprint is the data you leave behind when you go online. It’s what you’ve said, what others have said about you, where you’ve been, images you’re tagged in, personal information, social media profiles, and much more. It can have serious impacts on your online identity, professional presence, reputation, security, and relationships to others. Footprints may be out there for years, even for (or beyond) a lifetime.

SOURCE: Slideshare

LiquidText: The smart way to read

UTILITY/ APP: LiquidText offers a fast, natural way to review, gather, and organize information across all your documents and webpages—then apply the results to writing reports, meeting prep, or simply studying. Pull out key facts and connect them together, squeeze a document to compare sections, draw a line to connect ideas in different documents, comment on multiple pages at once, build upon your thoughts, and much more.

SOURCE: LiquidText

For the illiterate adult, learning to read produces enormous brain changes

ARTICLE: The brain did not evolve to read. It uses the neural muscle of pre-existing visual and language processing areas to enable us to take in works of literature. Reading, usually, begins in the first years of schooling, a time when these brain regions are still in development. What happens, though, when an adult starts learning after the age of 30?

SOURCE: Scientific American

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