Category: Talking

The pie chart: data visualisation's star or villain?

The pie chart: data visualisation’s star or villain?

LONG ARTICLE FOR HARDCORE READERS: Multitudes of statisticians and visualisation experts have attacked the pie chart and pushed for the use of alternatives. Though early criticism primarily appealed to logic, in the last 40 years, pie chart critics have marshalled experimental evidence that seems to demonstrate the inferiority of pie charts at accurately conveying information. SOURCE: Priceonomics ...
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The best and the worst ways to argue: 7 levels

The best and the worst ways to argue: 7 levels

INFOGRAPHIC: Disagreement is a far more common form of response to statements and arguments. Agreeing tends to motivate people less than disagreeing; when you agree there's less to say. When we disagree, we should be careful to do it well. Most of us can tell the difference between crude name-calling and a carefully reasoned refutation, but it would help to put labels on the intermediate stages. Here's an outline for a disagreement hierarchy based on 2 elements: the quality of the statement(s) used and the underlying emotion that accompanies the disagreement. SOURCE: Paul Graham ...
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Talk to Books: A Google tool for browsing passages from books using AI

Talk to Books: A Google tool for browsing passages from books using AI

UTILITY: Type in a question or a statement, the model looks at every sentence in over 100,000 books to find the responses that would most likely come next in a conversation.  Although it has a search box, its objectives and underlying technology are fundamentally different than those of a more traditional search experience. It enables an AI to find statements that look like probable responses to your input rather than a finely polished tool that would take into account the wide range of standard quality signals. Talk to Books is more of a creative tool than a way to find specific answers. You may need to play around with it to get the most out of it. SOURCE: Talk to Books ...
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How to stop someone from talking incessantly

How to stop someone from talking incessantly

INFOGRAPHIC/ VIDEO: Some people love to hear themselves talk so much that, try as you might, you can’t get a word in edgewise. One part art of the problem is that you’re waiting for them to pass the baton to you: they’re simply not going to do it. You don’t have to interrupt them; you can use your body language and shut them up with non-verbal cues . SOURCE: YouTube via Lifehacker ...
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Your speech Is packed with misunderstood, unconscious messages: "dysfluencies"

Your speech Is packed with misunderstood, unconscious messages: “dysfluencies”

ARTICLE: folk wisdom that ums and uhs betray a speaker as weak, nervous, ignorant, and sloppy, and should be avoided at all costs, even in spontaneous conversation. Many scientists, though, think that our cultural fixation with stamping out what they call “disfluencies” is deeply misguided. Saying um is no character flaw, but an organic feature of speech; far from distracting listeners, there’s evidence that it focuses their attention in ways that enhance comprehension. SOURCE: Nautilus ...
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A ritual for the later years of life: give away what you have treasured

A ritual for the later years of life: give away what you have treasured

VIDEO: We use rituals to mark the early stages of our lives, like birthdays and graduations -- but what about our later years? In this meditative talk about looking both backward and forward, Bob Stein proposes a new tradition of giving away your things (and sharing the stories behind them) as you get older, to reflect on your life so far and open the door to whatever comes next. SOURCE: TED ...
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The grim conclusions of the largest-ever study of fake news

The grim conclusions of the largest-ever study of fake news

ARTICLE: By every common metric, falsehood consistently dominates the truth on Twitter. Fake news and false rumours reach more people, penetrate deeper into the social network, and spread much faster than accurate stories. A massive new study analyses every major contested news story in English across the span of Twitter's existence-some 126,000 stories, tweeted by 3 million users, over more than 10 years-and finds that the truth simply cannot compete with hoax and rumour. Labeling fake news as such, on a social network or search engine, may do little to deter it. SOURCE: The Atlantic ...
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Say goodbye to the information age: it’s all about reputation now

Say goodbye to the information age: it’s all about reputation now

ARTICLE: Without an evaluative judgment about the reliability of a certain source of information, that information is, for all practical purposes, useless. From the 'information age', we are moving towards the 'reputation age', in which information will have value only if it is already filtered, evaluated and commented upon by others. In the reputation age, our critical appraisals should be directed not at the content of information but rather at the social network of relations that has shaped that content and given it a certain deserved or undeserved 'rank' in our system of knowledge. A civilised cyber-world will be one where people know how to assess critically the reputation of information sources, and can empower their knowledge by learning how to gauge appropriately the social 'rank' of each bit of information that enters their cognitive field. SOURCE: Aeon ...
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