Is spirituality our instinctive disposition or is it acquired?

Spirituality

There’s a movement in sociology in the past hundred years or so, advocating, or in opposition to, what’s considered as the Intuitive Belief Hypothesis. The reasoning holds that religious thought and feelings is generally spontaneous, non-analytical, and therefore our innate thinking template. When we become much more searching we turn a lot less spiritual, the theory declares.

SOURCE: Big Think 


SUMMARY: 

There’s a movement in sociology in the past hundred years or so, advocating or opposing what’s considered as the Intuitive Belief Hypothesis. The reasoning holds that religious thought and feelings is generally spontaneous, non-analytical, and therefore our innate thinking template. When we become much more searching we turn a lot less spiritual, the theory declares. Those individuals who maintain robust religious mindsets are much more intuitive. These investigations concentrated on rational contemplating.

Alternatively, theological belief, these experts assert, is connected neither to rational nor instinctual reasoning.

There have actually been a few reports, as well, establishing that a number of spiritual individuals can easily hold spiritual and analytical ideas within their consciousness concurrently.

Rather than polar opposites, these researchers found that intuition and analytical thinking may operate as “Two minds in one brain.” Sustaining this, brain imaging investigations have recently figured out that even though logical reasoning emanates from the right prefrontal cortex, religious belief derives from a different location, the ventral medial prefrontal cortex.

In a research study, lead author Miguel Farias and coworkers utilized a probability bead game to analyze 89 pilgrims of differing years, ethnic group, and religious faith. Researchers picked pilgrims traversing the Camino de Santiago as targets that one may evaluate whether or not there’s an association involving intuitive thinking and religious belief.

Researchers considered the outcomes of the activity and sought to discover if greater degrees of unreflecting thought patterns were associated with theological or religious conviction. Once more, no connection involving spiritual belief and intuitive cognition.

With another report, researchers wished to know whether holding down analytical thinking by means of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) had an effect. This is using low-level electrical current to stimulate the brain in a certain way. A painless procedure, electrodes are placed on the scalp and deliver current in a way that either improves communication between brain regions, or suppresses particular regions for certain desired effects. Here, tDCS was used to increase cognitive inhibition—the ability to inhibit unwanted thoughts or behaviour. Doing so also suppresses analytical thinking. No subject experienced any sort of transformation in their religious or spiritual perspectives as a consequence of neurostimulation.

The lead author of the study conjectures: “We don’t think people are ‘born believers’ in the same way we inevitably learn a language at an early age. … What we believe in is mainly based on social and educational factors, and not on cognitive styles, such as intuitive/analytical thinking.  … Religious belief is most likely rooted in culture rather than in some primitive gut intuition.”

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