Men and women think differently because their brains are built differently

Cognitive differences

Data from animal research, cross- cultural surveys, natural experiments and brain-imaging studies demonstrate real, if not always earthshaking, brain differences, and that these differences may contribute to differences in behavior and cognition. Many of these cognitive differences appear quite early in life.

Could underlying biological differences — subtle though they may be for most of us — help explain these gaping between-sex imbalances in the prevalence of mental disorders and account for the cognitive and behavioural differences observed between men and women?

SOURCE:  Stanford Medicine


Created using ExplainToMe: Automatic Web Article Summarizer

Quick summary:

  • Data from animal research, cross- cultural surveys, natural experiments and brain-imaging studies demonstrate real, if not always earthshaking, brain differences, and that these differences may contribute to differences in behavior and cognition. Many of these cognitive differences appear quite early in life.
  • The neuroscience literature shows that the human brain is a sex-typed organ with distinct anatomical differences in neural structures and accompanying physiological differences in function.
  • In a 2014 study, University of Pennsylvania researchers imaged the brains of 428 male and 521 female youths — an uncharacteristically huge sample — and found that the females’ brains consistently showed more strongly coordinated activity between hemispheres, while the males’ brain activity was more tightly coordinated within local brain regions.
  • To some appreciable degree, these brain differences have to translate to behavioral differences. Could underlying biological differences — subtle though they may be for most of us — help explain these gaping between- sex imbalances in the prevalence of mental disorders and account for the cognitive and behavioral differences observed between men and women?
  • Experiments have pinpointed genes whose activity levels differ strongly at specific sites in male versus female mice’s brains. What would happen, we can speculate, if you knocked out of commission one or another of these genes whose activity level differed between male and female brains?
(Visited 16 times, 16 visits today)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Just a test to ensure that a person is using this form *

Thinking | Teaching | Talking © 2017 Frontier Theme
SUBSCRIBE